Ward 17- Capital

Want to know how Ward 17 City Council candidates compare in terms of taking climate action? Then read on! 

   1. The YES/NO grid below shows whether candidates agree to commit to a specific environmental action.

    2. The devil is in the details. Not all "yes" or "no" answers are equal. We HIGHLY recommend reading the long answers found beneath the grid, to get a real understanding of how committed Candidates are to a range of environmental issues.

 

Ward 17- Capital
  Questions Answers
    Rebecca Bromwich Shawn Menard Daniel Rogers
1 Will you commit to fully funding and implementing the City of Ottawa’s Energy Evolution Plan?  Yes Yes Yes
2 Will you commit to no more extensions of the urban boundary, and support building more 15-minute neighborhoods throughout the City of Ottawa, not just in the urban core?  No Yes No
3 Will you commit to phasing out natural gas infrastructure and prioritize conservation and efficiency over new, renewed or expanded gas infrastructure?  Yes Yes No
4 Will you commit to investing in energy efficient housing for lower income communities, and ensuring that the costs of retrofits are not passed down to tenants?  Yes Yes No
5 Will you commit to prioritizing climate adaptation planning for the city, including measures to protect people, infrastructure and city services, and to ensure that the city's most vulnerable populations are supported during extreme climate events? Yes Yes Yes
6 Will you commit to building a public transit system that is rapid, reliable, affordable and accessible for all users, with proper transit routes within rural, suburban and lower income communities?  Yes Yes Yes
7 Will you commit to an active transit network with interconnected and protected bike lanes and multi-use paths City-wide (not just in the downtown core)? Yes Yes No
8 Will you support our target for a 40% tree canopy cover per neighborhood and protection of mature trees through the new Tree Protection By-Law?   Yes Yes Yes
9 Will you ensure that the City of Ottawa prioritizes the conservation of existing greenspace, as well as biodiversity on both city and privately owned lands by actioning the following: amending the property standards by-law, as well as increasing targets for and allocating more funds towards naturalization?  Yes Yes No
10 In addition to improving recycling, will you support ambitiously collecting organic green bin waste for composting in multi-residential buildings as well as curbside, to ensure that Ottawa can avoid replacing the Trail Road landfill site with either a new landfill or an incinerator for residual waste for the foreseeable future?  Yes Yes Yes
11 Will you support the introduction of a user pay system for curbside residual waste collection, where residents pay for the bags or containers that they put out for collection, according to the actual level of service that they use? Yes Yes No
12 If elected, would you intentionally include, and work in partnership with, the Algonquin Anishinaabe people and other Indigenous people in the creation and implementation of environmental policies? Yes Yes No
13 Will you commit to developing strategies that bring Ottawans at all diversity intersections together on environmental issues? Yes Yes Yes
  # Yes 12 13 6
  # No 1 0 7

Rebecca Bromwich

Yes.

Shawn Menard

Yes. We need to establish a partnership between Ottawa and other levels of government for retrofits to city buildings, commercial buildings and to all residences. Insulation, hot water upgrades, heating systems and solar power generation all present great opportunities for the city and residents to save money and lower emissions. Transportation is also an area where we need to move more swiftly, ensuring that we are not locked into diesel infrastructure on bus service and the LRT. In order to finance some of these initiatives, we should create a City of Ottawa revolving climate fund, that would take savings created by climate action and reinvest into more climate mitigation and adaptation initiatives. 

Dan Rogers

Yes. 

Rebecca Bromwich

No. I commit to intensifying the urban core. I am not able to commit to no more extensions of the urban boundary because projected population growth is very high. I do commit to preferentially choosing intensification over sprawl.

Shawn Menard

Yes. Our office opposed the expansion of the urban boundary, which is both environmentally detrimental and cost inefficient. The development charges imposed on new developments cover up-front costs, but not operational expenses for infrastructure, which continue to accrue for well over 50 years.  Holding the line on the urban boundary would have resulted in 1137ktCO2 of emissions reductions compared to the balanced scenario. To put that amount in context, that’s the same carbon reduction that would come from a deep energy retrofit of every municipal building or fully electrifying the transit fleet, to the tune of over $800 million. While this decision has been made, we can now focus on spreading density equally within the City, and ensuring that residents have supporting services and infrastructure.

Dan Rogers

No. Population growth over the next 25 years would prohibit such an undertaking.

Rebecca Bromwich

Yes.

Shawn Menard

Yes. Last year we passed a motion through Council that the City of Ottawa request the Government of Ontario develop and implement a plan to phase-out gas-fired electricity generation by 2030 to help the City of Ottawa, the Province of Ontario and the Government of Canada meet their climate targets; and that the City of Ottawa call on the IESO to give full consideration to wind and solar, demand response, Quebec Hydro, and conservation. We cannot meet our climate targets if we invest in more fossil fuel infrastructure, and we are committed to phasing it out as part of the Climate Emergency declaration we passed unanimously back in 2019. 

Dan Rogers

No. Municipal government has no authority over the decisions of provincial boards or agencies.. That said, conservation and efficiencies should always be strived for.

Rebecca Bromwich

Yes.

Shawn Menard

Yes. Existing buildings are the single biggest source of greenhouse gas emissions in Ottawa. To meet our target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2050, 95 per cent of commercial and industrial, as well as large residential buildings, must reduce energy for heating use by 70 per cent and for electricity use by 30 per cent by 2040. This makes subsidizing energy retrofits in older buildings a highly efficient strategy for achieving emission reduction targets. The equity component is also a compelling reason for the City to subsidize retrofits as low income residents disproportionally feel the effects of climate change. They should not also be on the line for retrofits which save money long-term, but are expensive to implement up front. 

Dan Rogers

No. Cannot commit to funding without knowing the cost of that funding.

Rebecca Bromwich

Yes.

Shawn Menard

Yes. In the past we've seen money cut from the City's climate change mitigation budget to deal with extreme weather events like flooding and tornadoes. We need to consistently fund both mitigation and adaptation to climate change, so that we address the root causes of the climate crisis while prioritizing those who are most vulnerable. 

Dan Rogers

Yes. 

Rebecca Bromwich

Yes. Expanding transit infrastructure is one of my priorities.

Shawn Menard

Yes. Absolutely. In terms of bus service, we need to work directly with riders and bus operators to re-orient routes to better serve local communities in the urban, suburban and rural areas; immediately freeze the price of fares (which are some of the highest in North America with declining ridership); and test free transit pilot projects, including under 18 throughout the city.

On the LRT, the City needs to implement the findings of the judicial public inquiry for future transit planning. They should focus on launching a public task force in the first 100 days reviewing the root causes of the infrastructure issues and the warranty in the project agreement for improving the line, including tracks and trains.

Dan Rogers

Yes. 

Rebecca Bromwich

Yes.

Shawn Menard

Yes. It is essential that our bike routes are not isolated segments, but instead that they connect to public transit service and key infrastructure such as libraries, schools, and hospitals. Using bike and pedestrian infrastructure to address the first and last leg of each trip is an effective way to get people out of their cars, and using other modes of transit. This is particularly important in the suburbs, where distances between services are longer. Bike lanes cost a fraction of the cost of roads to build and maintain, and it is important to build them properly - paint is not infrastructure and it does not provide adequate protection. 

I have focused on improving cyclist and pedestrian safety in our ward through projects such the addition of the Bank Street Bridge bike lanes, redesign of Bronson avenue intersection by Carelton, and reduction of the speed limit to 30km/hour throughout residential areas of the ward. I will continue to push for an expansion of the active transportation network throughout the city, both in terms of construction, and winter maintenance. 

Dan Rogers

No. Ottawa has an excellent bike path network. Where it can be improved, I would support. I would take more care with improving our sidewalks.

Rebecca Bromwich

Yes.

Shawn Menard

Yes. I do support the 40% tree canopy target, and would like to see more localized neighborhood level tree canopy cover targets, considering the significant losses we are seeing in the urban core. There have been studies comparing the loss of canopy cover over time through distinct areas of the City, and through a refresh of this data we can work strategically to fill in gaps we see downtown through the pressures of development, aging trees, and derecho storm that took out many mature trees this spring. 

I have been an advocate for trees throughout the City, on a local level in terms of protecting the trees along the Grande Alle in Old Ottawa East, and opposing the sighting of the new civic hospital parking garage which would see many trees cut down through the experimental farm. At a larger scale as vice chair of Environment Commtitee, I brought a motion forward forward with Councillor McKenney to expand the diameter for distinctive trees to 30cm not only in inner urban areas, but also within suburban lands.

Dan Rogers

Yes. 

Rebecca Bromwich

Yes.

Shawn Menard

Yes. We need to encourage and allow for a greater diversity of native species to support pollinators and naturalize existing areas for wildlife conservation. In my role as Councillor, I have worked with community groups to facilitate the planting of native species of trees in Brewer and the removal of invasives through parks in the ward along the Rideau River. I also supported a motion from Councillor Dudas to allow gardening and naturalization efforts along the City owned right-of-way. In the midst of a climate emergency, the City should support efforts to preserve and enhance green infrastructure. 

Dan Rogers

No. I would need more information on the outcomes of actioning such amendments.

Rebecca Bromwich

Yes.

Shawn Menard

Yes. In my role as Vice Chair of Environment Committee I have pushed for faster conversion of multi-residential buildings into the organic waste stream. This includes supporting a focus group of residents and building owners to address challenges with converting spaces within existing buildings to accommodate waste storage and curbside collection. We have the capacity to reduce waste at the source by making it easier and more convenient to compost. Considering the cost and environmental effects of opening a new landfill or burning waste, it is imperative that we do so. 

Dan Rogers

Yes. Public education is obviously necessary to make certain the public correctly puts their waste in the proper bin.

Rebecca Bromwich

Yes.

Shawn Menard

Yes. We need to reduce organic waste to landfill. Siting a new landfill would be $400 million and incineration even more expensive. We support a new model of waste collection that reduces the bags allowed to be put out at the curb, with a ban on organics. A user pay system for waste collection above a certain number of bags makes sense. We’ve seen this work in other jurisdictions, as an effective way to incentivize behavior. It is part of the solution to reducing waste, in concert with enhanced multi-residential composting and recycling, more education and outreach in the community, as well as efforts to minimize waste at the level of producer responsibility. 

Dan Rogers

No. The city should re-evaluate how it spends the money it has. A decision should be made on what services the public can expect from government for the funding the public provides.

Rebecca Bromwich

Yes.

Shawn Menard

Yes, it is essential that a diversity of indigenous voices are consulted. For example, the vote to expand the urban boundary and include the Tewin development was a decision with monumental environmental implications. It was framed as an act of reconciliation when no consultation was done with all of the Algonquin First Nations in the areas. The expansion of the boundary has implications for Indigenous groups, including the erosion of productive agricultural areas, as well as threatening sensitive environmental areas through development. 

Dan Rogers

No. Indigenous affairs is a federal jurisdiction. That said, all people should work to improve the implementation of better environmental policies.

Rebecca Bromwich

Yes.

Shawn Menard

Yes. Absolutely. Too often in public consultations groups invest time and energy in the process, but their recommendations do not appear in the final results. In order to have a successful environmental policy, we need to prioritize the voices of residents and work to find a compromise between voices as we center those who have historically been excluded. 

Dan Rogers

Yes. 

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